ADVERTISEMENT

Triangle Restaurant Week kicks off in Raleigh: dates, restaurants

Krill's menu is meant to be shared, with dishes like Peking duck lumpia rolls, a daily ceviche, fried rice and a daily wok-fried fish.

Krill’s menu is meant to be shared, with dishes like Peking duck lumpia rolls, a daily ceviche, fried rice and a daily wok-fried fish.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Triangle restaurant scene has seen a post-pandemic comeback, making Triangle Restaurant Week the perfect time to revisit old favorites or discover new ones.

The area’s oldest organized restaurant week runs from January 23-29 and offers diners a unique opportunity to support local restaurants.

This year, 50 participating restaurants throughout the Triangle are offering special prix fixe multi-course menus as part of an effort to support locally owned restaurants during the slow months of the year.

The event started 16 years ago and gives residents the chance to try a wide variety of cuisines at special prices two weeks a year. A second restaurant week is held in June.

No reservations, tickets, or memberships are required to try a restaurant, although some recommend making reservations on busy nights.

RAL_061922_amk_rooftop04.JPG
Young Hearts Distilling in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina is a balcony bar that offers a variety of eccentric cocktails, including the Galaxy Paloma, Honeysuckle Mule with the house brand of vodka, and a blueberry lemonade. Angelina Katsanis [email protected]

Who participates in Triangle Restaurant Week?

Raleigh, Cary, Durham, Chapel Hill and Knightdale are home to participating restaurants, ranging from brasseries to bars serving Southern staples.

The cuisines run the gamut: Asian fusion, Italian, Mexican, Southern, Mediterranean and more.

The list includes reliable spots like all three locations of Firebirds Wood Fired Grill and downtown Raleigh staples like Sitti, Oro, Taverna Agora and Gravy.

The Pit handles things for barbecue lovers, and North Hills’ Coquette Brasserie handles the weekly French specials.

Restaurants that have opened in recent years also make the list: Krill in Durham, Glasshouse Kitchen in Research Triangle Park; Young Hearts Distilling & Kitchen in Raleigh; Peck & Plume in Cary and Piero’s Pasta & Wine in Chapel Hill.

The full list of Triangle Restaurant Week participants along with hours and menus is available at trirestaurantweek.com/restaurants.

The restaurants will offer a special 2- or 3-course menu with specials ranging from $20-$30, or $40-$50 each day they are open.

“We are still recovering from a post-pandemic world and have seen a significant drop in restaurant participation due to supply chain shortages and increased food prices,” said Damon Butler, founder of Triangle Restaurant Week, in a statement.

“These continued obstacles that restaurants face have also caused some restaurants to choose a higher price point for their menu and only offer two courses instead of three,” Butler said. “We are very excited to be able to still offer this event, as many people look forward to it year after year.”

Triangle Restaurant Week used to feature more than 100 restaurants before the pandemic, according to Kelly Stewart, Triangle Restaurant Week’s program director.

But this year’s event has the most restaurants since January 2020, Stewart said in a news release.

“Restaurant Week is still an event that many people look forward to participating in, and while we’re not at over 100 restaurants like we were before the pandemic, this winter’s event marks the highest turnout we’ve seen since January 2020, and that’s great news,” Stewart said.

Since the inaugural event, Triangle Restaurant Week organizers say it has reached 1.2 million residents and featured more than 125 restaurants in the region.

Related stories from the Raleigh News & Observer

Aaron Sanchez-Guerra is a breaking news reporter for The News & Observer and previously covered business and real estate for the newspaper. Her background includes reporting for WLRN Public Media in Miami and as a freelance reporter in Raleigh and Charlotte covering Latino communities. He is a graduate of North Carolina State University, a native speaker of Spanish and was born in Mexico. You can follow his work on Twitter at @aaronsguerra.