Climate Change Proposals Put America’s Food Supply at Risk, Dairy Farmer Says

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

A fourth-generation dairy farmer fears potential climate initiatives could threaten independent farmers and their ability to provide the US food supply.

Several nations have imposed regulations on the agricultural industry, such as limits on nitrogen emissions, prompting a backlash from farmers in those countries. The Biden administration has also indicated that its goal is to drive changes in the industry to address climate change.

“Americans are feeding this lie that climate change is because of agriculture and climate change is not going to get better until farmers and ranchers do better,” Stephanie Nash, a fourth-generation dairy farmer, told Fox News.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 2020, the EPA estimated that 11% of total US greenhouse gas emissions came from the agricultural sector, compared to 27% from transportation, 25% from energy, and 24% from electricity. industry.

CLIMATE CHANGE IS HERE AND CONGRESS MUST ACT NOW TO CREATE A CLEANER, HEALTHIER WORLD

President Biden, in his first address to Congress, proposed paying farmers to grow cover crops, which are planted to cover the soil rather than harvest it, to reduce carbon dioxide and improve soil health. He also encouraged the Department of Agriculture to use farm relief funds to incentivize carbon emission reductions on farms.

More recently, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published a new ESG proposal in March that would require companies to report the environmental impact of their practices. If enacted, American farmers and ranchers would be left vulnerable as major food-producing corporations could seek to buy small farms or import animal products to preserve their ESG rating.

Nash fears that the push to implement green policies around the world will continue to wipe out an already struggling agriculture industry facing skyrocketing costs for labor, fuel, seeds and fertilizer. He said that institutions like the World Economic Forum are “scaring” us with their prediction that by 2050 the world’s population will demand 70% more food than is consumed today and advocates a review of food production to meet that supply.

AMERICAN WORKERS ‘GOING TO PAY THE PRICE’ FOR BIDEN’S CLIMATE CHANGE AGENDA: SUNDAY’S BIG SHOW

Nash Farms is a fourth generation dairy farm located in Tennessee
(FoxNews)

“Well, if it continues to kill off our food supply and our American farmers, yes, we won’t have enough food,” he said.

The Inflation Reduction Act introduced last week would spend $369 billion on various climate change initiatives. The bill claims it would reduce carbon emissions by about 40% by 2030 (CAN YOU LINK TO THE INVOICE?) primarily through investment in renewable energy production and practices.

FOOD BANKS IN THE UNITED STATES EXPERIENCE GROWING DEMAND: “NO SIGN OF SLOWING DOWN SOON”

The Dutch government announced its plan to cut nitrogen emissions by 50% in June, sparking a huge backlash among farmers in the country. To meet its target, the plan calls for a 30% reduction in the number of Dutch cattle, whose manure produces nitrogen oxide, forcing many farms to close.

Farmers gather with their vehicles next to a border sign between Germany and the Netherlands to protest against climate initiatives (Photo by VINCENT JANNINK/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)

Farmers gather with their vehicles next to a border sign between Germany and the Netherlands to protest against climate initiatives (Photo by VINCENT JANNINK/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)
(VINCENT JANNINK/ANP/AFP via Getty Images)

Similarly, the Canadian government proposed a 30% cut in nitrogen emissions from fertilizers by 2030 as part of a plan to reach net-zero emissions over the next three decades, prompting a backlash from farmers. And New Zealand has proposed a plan to tax farmers for emissions from their cattle’s farts and burps.

Nash, who said his family moved their century-old dairy farm from California to Tennessee in 2015 because of the Golden State’s restrictive agricultural policies that limit water use, fears rising production costs and existing regulatory restrictions .

FARMERS AND CONSUMERS FIGHT AS FOOD PRICES EXPECTED TO RISE HIGHER

She said the push by corporations and wealthy individuals like Bill Gates to move away from animal products toward plant-based foods is rooted in misinformation and ulterior motives.

Dutch farmers line up tractors for a national day of protest to demand more respect for their profession.  (AP Photo/Mike Corder)

Dutch farmers line up tractors for a national day of protest to demand more respect for their profession. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)

“They can say it’s for the future and they want to feed Americans, but honestly, they’re putting chemically grown food into our bodies,” he said. Imitation meats like Beyond Meat contain synthetic preservatives and red #3 food dye that was banned by the FDA for use in cosmetics in 1990, according to the Center for Consumer Freedom.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Looking ahead, Nash said to keep an eye on the 2025 Farm Bill, legislation passed about once every five years, which he fears will be used to give the EPA more access and control over independent farmers.

“There is no backbone in Washington, DC and not enough family farmers and ranchers in office to protect us in the United States,” he said.