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A 23-year-old woman can store enough food for five years

A young woman, frightened by the empty supermarket shelves she witnessed during the pandemic, stocked up on five years’ worth of food.

Gubba, who lives outside Seattle, Washington, stocked her pantry with home-grown fruits and vegetables, canned goods, rice and pasta.

The 23-year-old content creator decided to become self-sufficient after seeing people “struggle for food” during the coronavirus pandemic.

Gubba, who goes by his first name, says some of his funds are prepared for a catastrophic event that could last up to 30 years.

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A woman who feared empty grocery shelves during the pandemic has now stocked her pantry with home-grown fruits and vegetables, canned goods, rice and pasta.

Gubba, a content creator based near Seattle, Washington, decided to become self-sufficient after seeing people “struggle for food” during the coronavirus pandemic.

Gubba’s three-layer storage system

Short term: Fresh fruits and vegetables are used daily, along with canned foods such as peanut butter

Medium term: Excess canned goods, as well as boxed and freeze-dried products

Long term: pasta, beans and rice in bags, as well as its own canned goods and “ten pound” cans

Gubba first moved out of town in 2021 after buying a 38-acre farmhouse in 1970, and has been homesteading it ever since.

It was there that he taught himself how to grow fresh fruits and vegetables, and how to preserve them using methods such as freeze-drying and canning.

Gubba, who lives with her five Shepard dogs, talks about her preparations: “My current food will last me five years.

“Before that, I lived in the city and lived on food from the supermarket.

“During the pandemic, I saw empty shelves and people struggling for food and wanted to be self-sufficient.

“I started reading gardening books and started a small garden. Now I am mostly self-sufficient. I didn’t know how to grow or grow food, but now I can.

The owner of the house also has 13 chicken flocks, has fruit trees, and grows vegetables such as garlic, tomatoes, lettuce, and cucumbers.

“I have apple, pear, peach, tangerine and cherry trees,” Gubba said.

“And I grow raspberries, blackberries and blueberries.

They are great for jams, pies, or even frozen to use later in a cocktail.

“I grow a variety of vegetables. I make the tomatoes and peppers into salsa and they will keep for 10 years or more if possible.’

Gubba uses a three-tier system for food storage – its warehouse holds everything from everyday food, including fresh produce and canned goods.

The 23-year-old (pictured with her bees) taught herself to grow fresh fruit and vegetables after moving home.

Gubba (pictured with his chickens) also learned to preserve food using methods such as freeze-drying and canning.

The 23-year-old (pictured with her bees, left, and chickens) taught herself to grow fresh fruit and vegetables after moving home.

Gubba, who only gives his first name, says some of his products (pictured) can last up to 30 years in the event of an accident.

Gubba, who only gives his first name, says some of his products (pictured) can last up to 30 years in the event of an accident.

Gubba, who bought a farmhouse last year, uses a three-tier system for food storage

Gubba, who bought a farmhouse last year, uses a three-tier system for food storage

On the middle floor, it stores boxed and freeze-dried products, while its long-term storage is home to pasta and its own canned goods.

“I store pasta in Mylar bags with oxygen absorbers. They can live up to 20 years,” Gubba said.

‘Freeze-dried items can be stored for up to 30 years and are as fresh as when frozen.

‘Freeze-drying takes all the moisture out of the food, so it needs to be rehydrated.’

Gubba now spends his days doing chores on the farm before creating his social media content and stream.

He runs his own YouTube channel with more than 8,000 followers, where he provides advice to viewers on self-sufficiency and the best ways to prepare for a disaster, whether it’s a hurricane, flood or other pandemic.

“Everyone can have a food pantry,” she said.

“You can leave food under your bed. I have plenty of food for myself and my neighbors. I’m ready for anything.’

In his blog titled Homestead, Gubba emphasized the importance of doomsday preparation: “I believe everyone should have a food pantry because it’s a way to protect yourself from the uncertainties of life and the unexpected events of the world. ..

“No matter how many global emergencies there are [people] persevere, they still insist that the grocery store mentality be their protector. No organization, program, or grocery store is your protection—YOU are your only protection!

“Stop depending on outside sources to take care of you, it’s a failed mindset. Do you want to fight the people next time disaster strikes?’

He added, “You can prepare so that you can not only survive but also thrive in disaster scenarios.

“Can you feed your family and be self-sufficient in a scenario where grocery stores clear out in the unlikely future?” If not possible, start preparing now.’